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Bruin Success with Less Stress

Now that Eddie knows a little bit more about writing, citing, and documenting, help him make some choices. Give it your all—you will be graded!

Question 1 of 8

Eddie copies and pastes a few sentences from a web site into his paper. The web site doesn't list an author, sponsor, or a date. Eddie should...

a. Not quote or cite it. There's not enough information to write a citation and if it's on the web, it's public information and is considered common knowledge.

b. Quote and cite it.

Nope. Eddie needs to quote it and cite it using the available information. And not everything on the web is common knowledge. PLUS, Eddie really needs to think twice about using this site as part of his research—he doesn't even know who wrote it or when it was written! (For more, see What to Cite and Cite at the End.)

Yes. Eddie needs to quote it and cite it using the available information. And not everything on the web is common knowledge. PLUS, Eddie really needs to think twice about using this site as part of his research—he doesn't even know who wrote it or when it was written! (For more, see What to Cite and Cite at the End.)

Question 2 of 8

While writing his paper, Eddie looks through his class notes and finds something his professor said that would totally support his argument. Eddie includes it in his paper. Eddie should...

a. Quote and cite it.

b. Not quote and cite it.

Yes. Eddie should definitely quote and cite it. He's using someone else's ideas and words—even if they were spoken.

Nope. Eddie should definitely quote and cite it. He's using someone else's ideas and words—even if they were spoken. (For more, see "What to Cite," and "Cite at the End.")

Question 3 of 8

Eddie starts documenting his sources using MLA style. Halfway through his paper, he decides that he likes APA style better so he switches. Does he have to go back and change his MLA citations to APA, or does it not matter?

a. Go back and change them.

b. It doesn't matter.

Yes. It is good that Eddie documented his sources—that is the most important thing. But it is better if he sticks with one citation style throughout his paper. Many instructors would lower Eddie's mark if he inaccurately or inconsistently followed a citation style. (For more, see "How to Cite: Do It with Style.")

Nope. It is good that Eddie documented his sources—that is the most important thing. But it is better if he sticks with one citation style throughout his paper. Many instructors would lower Eddie's mark if he inaccurately or inconsistently followed a citation style. (For more, see "How to Cite: Do It with Style.")

Question 4 of 8

If Eddie provides in-text citations, should he also write a list of complete citations at the end of his paper?

a. As long as he cites his source, he's OK. He can just use in-text citations.

b. Eddie should also provide a list of citations at the end of his paper if he provides in-text citations.

Nope. In-text citations point the reader to the appropriate complete citation for the source at the end of a paper. They are used together so Eddie should use both. Always check the citation manual for the style you're using for details. (For more, see "How to Cite: During and After.")

Yes. In-text citations point the reader to the appropriate complete citation for the source at the end of a paper. They are used together so Eddie should use both. Always check the citation manual for the style you're using for details. (For more, see "How to Cite: During and After.")

Question 5 of 8

Eddie needs to cite:

a. quotes only

b. quotes and paraphrases only

c. paraphrases and summaries only

d. quotes, paraphrases and summaries

Nope. Always cite quotes, paraphrases and summaries. (For more, see "Quoting, Summarizing and Paraphrasing in a Nutshell.")

Yes. Always cite quotes, paraphrases and summaries. (For more, see "Quoting, Summarizing and Paraphrasing in a Nutshell.")

Question 6 of 8

Eddie summarizes a really long article. Eddie is skeptical of the statements made in the article and includes those feelings within the summary. Is that OK?

a. Sure. It's important for Eddie to express his criticisms.

b. No. The summary should just stay true to the source.

Nope. The summary should stay true to the source and Eddie must make a clear distinction between his thoughts and words and someone else's. (For more, see "Tips on Summarizing.")

Yes. The summary should stay true to the source and Eddie must make a clear distinction between his thoughts and words and someone else's. (For more, see "Tips on Summarizing.")

Question 7 of 8

Eddie includes citations in his paper because:

a. Citations add credibility to his arguments.

b. Citations take up space in his paper.

c. Documenting sources is what scholars do when they are engaging in written academic conversations.

d. a and b

e. c and a

Yes, but there's more. There are many reasons why Eddie should cite and document his sources. Adding credibility to his work and following the conventions used by scholars when engaging in written academic conversations are just two. Taking up space in his paper is just an added bonus but not a reason for including citations in his paper. (For more, see "Why Cite.")

Nope. There are many reasons why Eddie should cite and document his sources. Adding credibility to his work and following the conventions used by scholars when engaging in written academic conversations are just two. Taking up space in his paper is just an added bonus but not a reason for including citations in his paper. (For more, see "Why Cite.")

Yes. There are many reasons why Eddie should cite and document his sources. Adding credibility to his work and following the conventions used by scholars when engaging in written academic conversations are just two. Taking up space in his paper is just an added bonus but not a reason for including citations in his paper. (For more, see "Why Cite.")

Question 8 of 8

Eddie must cite which of the following if he uses them while writing his paper:

a. An interview he heard on the radio.

b. A comic strip he read in a zine.

c. Something he read on a blog.

d. All of the above.

e.None of the above.

Yes, but there's more. Eddie should document the works that he uses in his paper or that influence his ideas, even if it's a radio interview, a comic strip, or a blog. (For more, see "What to Cite.")

Yes. Eddie should document the works that he uses in his paper or that influence his ideas, even if it's a radio interview, a comic strip, or a blog. (For more, see "What to Cite.")

Nope. Eddie should document the works that he uses in his paper or that influence his ideas, even if it's a radio interview, a comic strip, or a blog. (For more, see "What to Cite.")