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Depression Grand Challenge

Librarian for Digital Research and Scholarship

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Zoe Borovsky, Ph.D.
Contact:
phone: 310-825-4954
https://ucla.zoom.us/my/zoepster

Humanities Reflecting on Depression

Albrecht Dürer - Melencolia I - Google Art Project ( AGDdr3EHmNGyA)The humanities are a set of disciplines that focus on the human condition and its manifold expressions, including health and illness. Humanities research employs methods that are historical, analytical, interpretive and/or speculative in nature. Humanities scholars may question the meaning of contemporary works or practices or they may focus on developing a better understanding or interpretation of works, practices, and cultural contexts in the past.

The Medical Humanities is an interdisciplinary field that spans philosophy and the arts (literature, film, visual art), ethics, culture studies, and intersects with more humanistic social sciences: history of science, science and technology studies, and medical anthropology.

Books

The following subject searches will yield books and articles regarding representations of depression. 

The UCLA Library, along with other libraries in the UC system, provides access to many books on the humanist interpretations of depression. When searching the UCLA Library Catalog (for resources at UCLA) or Melvyl (which searches across the UC system), you can use subject headings to narrow your search. Subject headings function like hashtags--for example, books on that focus on depression in art will likely be tagged with the subject heading "Depression -- in art"

Below are a few examples of subject heading searches related to depression and the humanities. To learn more about working with subject headings, see this video tutorial (subject headings start at 1:58) or ask a librarian for help. 

Selected Books from the UCLA Library Catalog

Article Databases

Example searches in ArticlesPlus:

Journals

UCLA researchers have access to these journals:

Bibliographies

Madness and Literature Network  -- has an extensive bibliography of first-person accounts of madness.

A few examples of relevant articles from the journals listed above

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