Film and Television 106B: European Film History

Distinguishing Scholarly Sources

Whether online or in print, scholarly sources can be identified in a number of ways. The databases listed in this guide contain some full text content online, depending on the resource. This content is not "the same" as many freely available internet sources like Wikipedia, because it is a subscription-based electronic version of scholarly writing that is often also available in print format. With any resource, regardless of format, there are several criteria to look for:

* Articles or books written by a scholar in the field

* Author provides works cited list of resources used

* Often published by scholarly societies, university presses and higher education-based publishers, associations, etc.

* Articles are usually much longer than in popular press magazines

* Scholarly criticism in cinema studies is different from a film review. A review is usually a short piece of criticism that is directed at a general movie-going audience. Scholarly criticism is much more detailed and involved in analysis of a film, director, or specific subject.

Secondary Source Journal and Magazine Article Databases

The article databases below index contemporary articles of criticism and history on film-related topics. If connecting from home, make sure your computer is configured for off-campus access. For articles that aren't full text online in a database, use the orange UC-elinks button to locate local subscriptions.