Mobile Apps and Sites for Health and Life Sciences

Library resources, apps, tips and tricks, and tools for smartphones

Quick Links


What kind of mobile device to you use the most?

iPhone: 9 votes (60%)
Droid: 2 votes (13.33%)
iPad: 3 votes (20%)
Windows Phone: 1 votes (6.67%)
Blackberry: 0 votes (0%)
Total Votes: 15

Request a Consultation

Current UCLA students, faculty, and staff can meet with librarians for in-depth consultations and personalized instruction on research topics, database mechanics, useful resources, and other subjects. To schedulean appointment or more information, submit this consultation request form.

Welcome to the Guide on Mobile Apps and Sites!

This guide is designed as the starting point for you to explore medical mobile apps and sites.

Most of these apps and sites work on iOS and Android OS platforms. While most of these applications and website are accessible to anyone, the guide also includes links to and information about several subscription databases available only to current Bruins.

Enjoy your medical mobile app and site voyage ahead!

What is mHealth?

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) this new area of mobile health—now often called simply “mHealth”—has the potential to be a transformative force. mHealth has the potential to change when, where, and how healthcare is provided; to ensure that important social, behavioral, and environmental data are used to understand the determinants of health; and to improve health outcomes.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says that the use of mobile and wireless technologies to support the achievement of health objectives (mHealth) has the potential to transform the face of health service delivery across the globe [WHO 2011]. 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says that a medical mobile app is "a mobile app that meets the definition of ‘device’ in section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act)." The FDA will also regulate mobile medical apps (MMA) and will "apply the same risk-based approach the agency uses to assure safety and effectiveness for other medical devices."


Translate this page!

Health and Life Sciences Informationist

Author's Note

Guide created and compiled by Bredny Rodriguez, Health and Life Sciences Informationist, UCLA Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library.

Special thanks to Kelli Ham, Consumer Health & Technology Coordinator at the NN/LM Regional Medical Library for the Pacific Southwest Region, Dr. Neil Parker, Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Graduate Medical Education at the David Geffen School of Medicine, and Julie Kwan, Associate Director of UCLA Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library and UCLA Science and Engineering Library, for feedback on content and presentation.